Status 4-18-2015

9:28 a.m.

The farmers market here in Corvallis starts today. And I am TIRED. Taking advantage of the good weather, the day before last my husband Che and I went to get (6) 2 liter bags of potting soil on our bicycle trailers, then yesterday we took a nice long 5 mile walk to an asian market in town (with a few stops for beer of course!)

The side effect of course, being that my body is now sick and tired of all this exercise! Unfortunately today needs to happen. In a half an hour I have to be ready to get back on my bike and ride downtown to the market. My knife needs sharpening and I really want to find a bunny (to eat).  Not to mention I need to keep my son in fruit. That’s a full time job in itself!

10:20 a.m.

We are on the hunt. We’ve perused the whole market once and are on our way back down. Talon’s eye finally falls upon Strawberries. In the midst of a huge crowd, I attempt to take a picture. I am minorly successful. I’m glad I gave him money before the market and don’t have to juggle backpack, my wallet, give him money, and take a photo at the same time.

15 - 1 (2).jpg


 

10:30 a.m.

Score! BUNNEH!!! aka Stewing rabbit (The nice lady said maybe I could get a picture of her next week)

11:45 a.m.

Home...omg..I’m going to die. Seriously, I won’t make it to the house. Ok, so I made it in the house. All I have to do is get this animal in the pot. Did I mention I got berries too?

12:00 Noon

Cut Leeks and potatoes, dismember said bunneh. Don't cut yourself.

 

12:30 p.m.

Brown bunneh pieces in peanut oil.

 

12:45 p.m.

Deglaze the pot with a dash of balsamic vinegar and a half cup water. After deglazing, add 3 to 4 cups of broth and arrange bunneh and veggies. The liquid should come almost to the top of the veg. Mmm…..

Cover and put into the oven at 200F for 1 hour. Increase temp to 320F and cook for 4 to 5 hours.

When the meat wants to com off the bones easily, it's done. It's going to take a long time. Strain the bunneh and veg, keeping the liquid in a separate pot. Arrange bunneh meat and veg in bowls. Make gravy with the liquid. I really really suggest Bisto Gravy, but it's not easy to get in the U.S. so any rich gravy would do. Dribble gravy over meat and vegetables in the bowl. 

  Now, I can hear everyone now. Ermagerd! BUNNEH!! That was my PET! But no. Truth time: The carbon footprint of raising rabbit for meat is far lower than a cow, they poop less, they take less water, and they produce faster. A responsible rabbit raiser can also provide manure that has double the Nitrogen of chicken manure, quadruple that of cow manure, and it smells like almost nothing. Rabbit meat has lower calories per pound than even chicken, and tastes just as good. There are some people who claim it is easier to digest, having less fat. This may be an option for those who are having intestinal difficulties but still need meat as a protein source.  Whoever you buy rabbit from should be able to tell you where they send the rabbits for processing. Local farms may process their rabbits themselves and should be willing to tell you about it. Responsible sellers of meat animals are proud of the way they raise and treat their animals for human consumption. They do not participate in hocus-pocus sleight of hand with their information.  This rabbit came from My Pharm in Monroe, Oregon. This farmer also raises lamb and pork for human consumption. Julia Sunkler is trained by Oregon State University in animal sciences and takes good care of her farm, her animals, and her customers. Now here's a tip when looking for rabbit. A stewing rabbit is older meat, make sure you stew that one for at least 4 to 5 hours. if you want rabbit for grilling or frying, ask for younger fryer rabbits.  Photography beyond the first photograph is by Che Dean.  Resources: http://agsci.oregonstate.edu/research/hand_rabbits.html http://www.vermontqualityrabbits.com/nutritional.html http://riseandshinerabbitry.com/2012/03/31/the-benefits-and-uses-of-rabbit-manure/  

 

Now, I can hear everyone now. Ermagerd! BUNNEH!! That was my PET! But no. Truth time: The carbon footprint of raising rabbit for meat is far lower than a cow, they poop less, they take less water, and they produce faster. A responsible rabbit raiser can also provide manure that has double the Nitrogen of chicken manure, quadruple that of cow manure, and it smells like almost nothing. Rabbit meat has lower calories per pound than even chicken, and tastes just as good. There are some people who claim it is easier to digest, having less fat. This may be an option for those who are having intestinal difficulties but still need meat as a protein source. 

Whoever you buy rabbit from should be able to tell you where they send the rabbits for processing. Local farms may process their rabbits themselves and should be willing to tell you about it. Responsible sellers of meat animals are proud of the way they raise and treat their animals for human consumption. They do not participate in hocus-pocus sleight of hand with their information. 

This rabbit came from My Pharm in Monroe, Oregon. This farmer also raises lamb and pork for human consumption. Julia Sunkler is trained by Oregon State University in animal sciences and takes good care of her farm, her animals, and her customers.

Now here's a tip when looking for rabbit. A stewing rabbit is older meat, make sure you stew that one for at least 4 to 5 hours. if you want rabbit for grilling or frying, ask for younger fryer rabbits. 

Photography beyond the first photograph is by Che Dean

Resources:
http://agsci.oregonstate.edu/research/hand_rabbits.html

http://www.vermontqualityrabbits.com/nutritional.html

http://riseandshinerabbitry.com/2012/03/31/the-benefits-and-uses-of-rabbit-manure/

 

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